Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 6, 2009 3:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jerry and the Travis Bean

Yeah--"edge" is a nice term for it...but here's the thing: a couple of accomplished lead players I knew/worked with in the 70s agree with this assessment, BUT they go to great pains to argue with me about the technical abilities that Jerry showed in 73 (that is the year these guys pick as best, not unlike many of the folks hereabouts).

So, I am willing to concede that there was something more complex, more refined, more technically accomplished about his playing in the 70s, but if you'll allow me, it might be like saying he learned to play classical guitar or some such...I know that's not what happened, and I still loved his playing then (just so JOTS knows), BUT the energy/edge/whatever knocks my socks off from the early era.

Just listening to the speed with which he delievers notes, the intensity of the sound, the unreal sounds he produces during the OOne from 12-29 was something he just didn't do during the yrs I heard him live...oh well. He was still great.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: skuzzlebutt Date: Apr 7, 2009 7:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jerry and the Travis Bean

We touched on this briefly a few weeks ago and I want to second what you're saying about Jerry's sound in the early/primal years (especially your beloved 1968, when his playing seemed at its most ferocious and nastiest) having more "punch". Whether it was the guitars, Jerry, the mix,the brand of acid, the atmosphere of the venues...WHATEVER it was...the visceral wallop he delivered in this period is unmatched. It seemed somewhat diluted as early as mid-'69 and was all but gone by 1971 (certainly by 1972), replaced with the jazzier style I think more people probably think of as the "classic" Garcia sound (if there is such a thing).

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: GennyBenni Date: Apr 7, 2009 9:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jerry and the Travis Bean

Nastiness, exhibit A: any version of "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl" from 1968

Garcia was definitely a nasty freak in 1968. But I don't think that his change in voice/style was any sort of conscious decision. Listening on a month-by-month basis (whenever possible) you can hear the evolution of his sound and it's very natural - there was never any abrupt change in style towards jazz, at least in my opinion.

For a while, I listened almost exclusively to 1968 like Will Tell, because of the energy. They are just so insane that year, it's hard to stop listening to it. It's almost like 1968 is candy, everything from that era just tastes so damn good. Luckily I was drawn to other years, often by single songs - like I started really digging 73-74 eyes, or 72 half steps, or 77 morning dews, and after some time I started listening to those years as much as 68. Now my time is split pretty evenly among years from the 60s and 70s.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: sugar_shack Date: Apr 7, 2009 10:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jerry and the Travis Bean

Does anybody else think that certain, I don't know what, was a by product of Pigpen being around and in good health? Pig was the guy that brought the grease, and it seems logical that as he moved on and out, Jerry mellowed greatly.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 7, 2009 4:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jerry and the Travis Bean

It is certainly possible that somehow, in some SF Cosmic Consciousness sense, PP was a major force in Jerry's life...Interesting. Love how the boys put in the effort with Mr Charlie--listening to RTs, 8-6, right now, and they clearly have fun interacting with Ron.

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)